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Thomas Middlecott
Thomas Middlecott@TMAkirton

Pupil Premium

What is the Pupil Premium?

 

The pupil premium is additional government funding given to schools in order to improve the achievement of disadvantaged children. Eligible pupils include those who have qualified for free school meals at any point in the last six years, as well as children who have been looked after in local authority care for more than one day.

During the academic year 2015/16, a total of 87 students at Thomas Middlecott Academy were eligible for support through the Pupil Premium.

The Pupil Premium allocation for 2015/16 was £140,000

 

Overall objectives for Pupil Premium spending within the academy

 

The pupil premium will be used:

 

  • to provide additional academic and pastoral support to accelerate progress and raise the achievement of eligible students
  • to improve outcomes for these students so that their achievement is closer to that of non-disadvantaged students, both nationally and within the academy
  • to ensure that eligible pupils have equal access to all of the opportunities provided by the academy.

The academy will ensure that the additional funding reaches the students who need it most and that it makes a significant impact on their learning and progress.

 

Accountability

 

The Associate Principal and the Senior Leadership Team will regularly and rigorously monitor, evaluate and review the strategies that have been put into place, funded through the pupil premium, and report to the Governing Body on progress and impact.

 

How the Pupil Premium was deployed: 2015/16

 

In making decisions about how the funding will be spent, the academy has considered a range of evidence, both from our own evaluations of the impact of funded strategies on eligible students and also from national research. 

 

The main strategies funded through the Pupil Premium were:

 

  • Specialist targeted support in English and mathematics for identified students including teaching assistant support, small group intervention, contribution to salaries and resources, transport for students in Y11 to access revision sessions
  • Contribution to off-site provision for identified students
  • Weekend and holiday revision classes
  • Music provision, including music tuition
  • The provision of resources for individual students, according to individual need, as well as funding for educational experiences such as trips and visits.
  • Agency/emotional support for students and/or their families
  • Specific careers advice

 

Impact of Support 2015/16

 

Students’ achievement

 

Evidence in the academy’s data and from students’ work indicates that, overall, those eligible for support through the Pupil Premium achieve slightly better from their individual starting points.

National data from 2015/16 shows that disadvantaged students in Year 11 achieved well in several areas.

 

 

The tables below show the above data as bar charts so that the performance of Pupil premium students compared with others in the school and nationally can be seen easily.

 

 

 

This evidence shows that our focus in Year 11 needs to be on improving the amount of progress students make, particularly in English and maths. Students receiving alternative education will need to be closely monitored to ensure that they are making good progress in the core subjects from their individual starting points.

Year 10 students performed better than non-disadvantaged students last year in: art, design and technology, drama, music, physical education, religious studies, science

Year 9 students performed better than non-disadvantaged students last year in: art, drama, English, ICT, music, physical education, religious studies

Year 8 students performed better than non-disadvantaged students last year in: art, drama, French, geography, history, and religious studies.

 

Impact of pastoral support

 

  • Evidence suggests that our disadvantaged students benefit considerably from the range of pastoral support provided for them through Pupil Premium funding.
  • The overall attendance of the group has remained consistently high
  • Counselling sessions and guidance provided by staff have helped students to tackle difficulties so that they are able to reach their full potential. 

 

Summary: Impact of Pupil Premium funding 2015-16

 

 

Our evaluation shows that the most effective strategies implemented in 2015-16 were as follows:

  • Personalised academic support in mathematics resulted in accelerated progress for almost all the students who received this support, particularly in Year 7 and 8
  • Evidence from students accessing the dedicated Revision Programme shows that this was particularly successful in helping these students maintain a sharp focus on their targets, evidence provided by student questionnaires.

 

Pupil Premium 2016-17

Total Pupil Premium allocation 2016-17: £125,000

 

The main barriers to educational achievement for disadvantaged students currently in the academy are as follows:

  • Poorer attendance for a significant minority in Years 10 and 11
  • Weak behaviour for a few students in Year 10 resulting in regular removal from lessons
  • Low literacy skills/limited command of English for a significant number of students in all year groups

 

The academy has drawn up a strategy for the deployment of the Pupil Premium in 2016-17.

Planned actions include:

 

  • Targeted additional support for identified students in English, mathematics, history and geography
  • Provision of the ECDL programme to support the overall achievement of identified students
  • The deployment of achievement mentors, who will hold one-to-one meetings with all eligible students in order to identify how we might best support them
  • The deployment of a Leader of Pupil Outcomes who will be responsible for tracking the achievement of all eligible students in Key Stages 3 and 4
  • Dedicated pastoral support including an inclusion officer and external counselling
  • The provision of additional resources for individual students as required, including books, funding for educational visits and similar
  • The provision of alternative education for students in Year 11 who find access to mainstream education challenging.

The impact and effect of these actions will be measured termly by senior leaders and governors. As a result, modifications may be made to the provision funded through the Pupil Premium.

 

Impact will be measured through:

 

  • Student progress data
  • Other quantitative data, eg, data on reading ages for strategies related to reading
  • Students’ views on the actions that have supported them most effectively collated through pupil progress review interviews with Year 11 students
  • Staff views on the impact of particular actions on students’ achievement and their attitudes to learning
  • Other qualitative evidence, eg, views of parents on how particular strategies have benefited their child.
  • Student case studies to measure impact of Pupil Premium fund on individual students

The academy’s Pupil Premium Strategy will be reviewed at each Governors’ meeting throughout the academic year.